Ambulance calls continue upward trend


The year-end 2012 report for the Montgomery Ambulance Service indicates the ‘service’ for the City of Montgomery and surrounding townships is a valuable asset for the area, based on patient volume.
The ambulance service covers a large area, consisting of the City of Montgomery, including Traditions of Montgomery, the City of Kilkenny, townships of Montgomery, Lanesburg, Derrynane, Kilkenny, Waterville, Lexington and Erin. Mutual aid adds a few calls each year, and service outside the area is available.
The four-year report submitted by EMS Director Neil Vlasak, indicates total patient volume of 257 in 2012, compared with 227 the previous year. The volume was down to 184 in 2010, after being at 230 in 2009.
The majority of the volume  came from the City of Montgomery, with 182 calls in 2012, up from 164 in 2011. Traditions had 44 calls in 2012, up from 17 previously. Montgomery Township had calls of 22-20 the past two years, Lanesburg shows 12-7, Kilkenny 7-14, and Erin 12-8.
Service outside the area adds substantial numbers to the volume, with 38 calls in 2012, 42 in 2011 and 26 back in 2010.
According to the report, the City of Montgomery has the greatest number of calls in August, October and January, with 26, 20 and 19 respectively.
The Montgomery Ambulance Service currently has 28 members, with 16 EMT’s, nine EMR’s (first responders), and three drivers/students. During 2012, five members left the service, while there were six new hires.
` “Our focus is to get the people we have to take shifts, so our roster is currently full,” said Vlasak. “However, that can always change at any time,” he added.
The new ambulance was put into service right before Kolacky Days in July, and Vlasak said it is running very well, with about 3,000 miles logged at years-end.
The EMS director said all personnel were required to go through training on the 800 MHz system by January 1. “It’s great, because we can be on opposite ends of the county and hear each other clearly,” he commented.
Vlasak said they’re currently working on establishing a relief association for members to join. “It would be a separate non-profit from the city organization and they would be able to do fund raising and donations, which cannot be done at the present time. We’re in the early stages of applying for a license from the state, and it could be up to a year before it would be established. The association will also need council input before it gets up and running,” he added.